Archive for the ‘Jeanne Bice’ Category

QVC Hottie Rick Domeier Tells Us About Life Makeovers In His New Book, ‘Do I Get A Do Over?’

December 9, 2010

QVC’s resident heart throb, Rick Domeier, has a book coming out in January. Jeez, this guy gets a publisher, and this poor Homeshoppingista doesn’t have one? But actually, it’s not much of a surprise.

Months ago when Domeier mentioned on-air that he was going to the Book Expo with an idea, we e-mailed him and asked what he was up to and to keep us apprised if he got anywhere. We believe he said that he would. Screwed again!

We were on Facebook Wednesday night, contentedly eating our hot and sour soup, when we saw that Domeier had posted — for his 1,000-plus friends — that his book was coming out. It’s called “Can I Get A Do Over?: Unforgettable Stories of Second Chances and Life Makeovers,” with Domeier borrowing that phrase from his son.

The Homeshoppingista, and all your hundreds of Friends, thank you for the “exclusive” tip, Rick.

Here’s what the butterscotch beauty posted:

This just in! OK, here’s the scoop. Some months ago, I came up with an idea for a Book. Yep, a BOOK… Real stories of Real people, told first person, who have ‘reinvented their lives’. My sons inspired the title. Took the proposal to BEA (Book Expo America) in big ol’ New York city. The Craziest thing happened: It Sold! With a forward by Joan Rivers, quotes from Suze Orman and friends, and stories galore…l

The book, which launches nationally Jan. 3 in outlets such as Barnes and Noble, Borders and Amazon.com, already has a page on Facebook, with a video of Domeier flogging his tome.

Here is the description offered:

In Can I Get A Do Over?: Unforgettable Stories of Second Chances and Life Makeovers (HCI Books, $14.95, January 3, 2011), multichannel retail giant QVC’s senior host Rick Domeier and inspirational author Max Davis take an up-close look at the amazing

So Domeier is a “senior” host, heh? We never heard that phrase before.

In the video, he says, “This book is bursting with positive energy.”

It appears that Domeier put the stories of several familiar QVC vendors, such as Lori Greiner and Jeanne Bice, in his book.

Domeier’s Facebook Friends were panting about his new book.

And his fellow hosts came through for him, with Lisa Robertson and Dan Wheeler posting complimentary comments On the “Do Overs” page.

From Robertson:

“In the fifteen years that I have known Rick, he never gives up, he always finds a way. I don’t know if he was born with it or learned it from necessity, but his book is a living example of what you can do with a ‘do over.’”
—Lisa Roberston, television personality and host of PM Style

No mention of QVC.

And from Dan Wheeler:

“We learned the ‘do over’ at recess but never in the classroom. This book offers ‘real life’ lessons on one of the most important subjects for successful living in the 21st century.”
—Dan Wheeler, television personality and author of Best Seat in the House

No mention of QVC.

One person asked Domeier if QVC will be selling his book. No answer on that yet.

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Guilty Of Returning Too Many Jeanne Bice Tops And Joan Rivers’ Jewelry? Irate QVC Customers Accuse Network of Reneging On 30-Day Unconditional Return Policy

September 30, 2009

For many months now, some posters on QVC’s online forums have been complaining about “the letter.” A number of customers claim they have received letters from the No. 1 home shopping network warning them that they are returning too many items. The gist of the letter is apparently that these excessive returns are costing QVC too much time and money.

Customer complaints have surfaced again this week, on a QVC forum thread called “The Letter! The Q Has A Lot of Nerve!” Several irked customers claim they were sent the letter, charging that the warning violates QVC’s stated policy of merchandise being able to be returned within 30 days, no questions asked.

Skeptical posters said if such a letter exists, how come nobody has posted it on the forums. But other customers claimed that the letter and excerpts from it have been repeatedly posted, only to be quickly deleted.

It’s unclear how many returns trigger a warning letter, or what the precise consequences are if you keep sending back products. Are you banned from placing future orders with QVC? Is your Q Card revoked? Some posters claimed QVC was threatening to close the accounts of compulsive product-returners.

Let’s put it this way: We have been reading complaints about this “letter” for at least six months now on QVC’s jewelry forum. Unless mass hysteria has hit QVC’s viewers, or they are compulsive liars, we’ve got to believe the letter does exist and is being mailed.

We’d love to see it, by the way, if you have a copy. There’s got to be some fans of Joan Rivers, Robert Lee Morris, Barbara Bixby, Michael Dawkins, Judith Ripka and Jeanne Bice who have gotten it.

QVC declined to comment on the matter. “QVC’s practice does not encompass sharing any information pertaining to our customers,” was the response from the home shopping channel’s PR department.

The purported letter has sparked a lively debate on the “Lot of Nerve” thread. There are 13 pages of comments. Some complained that they were returning more items because the quality of QVC’s products had gone downhill, or because of inconsistent sizing of its clothing. So customers shouldn’t be penalized for returning merchandise that’s not up to par, they argued.

“The new arrogance and greed of QVC never ceases to amaze me,” wrote one poster, who suggested people write their own letters to QVC’s president.

Another poster cited QVC’s return policy verbatim. “A customer may return an item to QVC (and its subsidiaries) for any reason within 30 days of the customer’s receipt of the item. QVC wants you to be completely satisfied with your purchase. If for any reason you’re not, send it back within 30 days of receipt for exchange or full refund of the purchase price, less applicable Q Return Label fee.”

She wrote, “If the above is NOT, in fact, QVC’s return policy, and QVC has some unwritten rule about the number of returns a customer can make, then what is stated above is clearly false advertising. I can’t imagine why QVC wouldn’t want to be as forthright as possible concerning their business practices.”

Others defended QVC, saying that “serial” returners were taking advantage of the 30-day return policy by using beauty or food items for nearly a month – or wearing clothes for special events — and then sending them back for a full refund.

Others argued that QVC was doing out-of-control shopaholics a favor by allegedly threatening to put the kibosh on their buying.

“I don’t blame QVC,” wrote one poster. “You must return close to 60 percent of purchases to get the letter.”

And still others said if customers are so dissatisfied with QVC’s products, whey do they keep shopping there?

“I do not think the letter is nervy,” yet another QVC defender wrote. “It’s good business.”

QVC’s Jeanne Bice Tells Her Wacky Quacker Fans About ‘Pot’ For Her 10th Anniversary

September 19, 2009

“I didn’t have a pot to piss in.”

That’s a phrase you don’t hear too often on QVC, but Jeanne Bice, the network’s upbeat queen of wildly embellished (some may say gaudy) clothing, let it rip today on her 10th Anniversary Show. Bice, whose line is called Quacker Factory, was telling a live studio audience about her new book, “The Rubber Duck Principle.” The book, co-written with her kids Tim and Lee Bice, is the inspirational story of how Ms. Bice coped when her husband abruptly died, and she went from being a wealthy housewive to not having that pot (a situation a lot of us laid-off reporters find ourselves in).

Bice’s road to success was her sequined-and-blinged-out clothing line, and she has a cult of fans who buy her garments and call themselves “Quackers,” as QVC viewers know. For everyone else: Folks, you can’t make stuff this up. Bice’s audience in West Chester was not only wearing her clothes, but also Quacker headgear. One woman was sporting a headband she had fashioned with a small stuffed duck on it, and another man had a hat with a stuffed duck on top of it. These fans show their appreciation for Bice by quacking for her. Some of us would do anything, even quack if he wanted us to, for someone like “Mad Men’s” Jon Hamm. But for most it’s hard to get worked up over a sweatshirt with pumpkins embroidered on it.

Bice, a jumbo-sized woman who always wears a retro headband around her forehead (as if she’s ready to head out to an aerobics class), today herself called some of her fans “wackadoo.” The New York Times Magazine did a story about Bice, which took a cynical view of her clothes and seemingly silly fans. But admittedly, poking fun at Bice and her Quackers is like shooting fish in a barrel. We say to each his — or her — own.

“Wear sparkle and shine no matter what size you are,” said Bice, a poster child for plus-sized women.